When It's Time to Upgrade Your Recurve Bow

in Archery

You've already been using a recurve bow for many years now, but it's time to upgrade and try out a new bow. While it's hard to move away from your old faithful bow since it's proved to work well for many years, getting a new recurve bow is like turning a new page.

If you've had your recurve bow for many years now, undoubtedly much has changed with bows since your last purchase. New technology that help to make your shot cleaner, faster and with less vibration have all been designed in recent years. If it's been a number of years since you have bought a recurve bow, or maybe you were still a teen when you bought the bow, make sure to purchase the right size draw length so that you get the most out of the bow that you choose.

Although your previous recurve bow may have served you well, try out different brands of recurve bows before making your final decision. For some reason, bow makers seem to go through phases where they will build great quality bows for many years, but then they decide to make changes to their manufacturing process, sometimes their quality suffers. For this reason, try out a few different brands and pay attention to the recent reviews of the latest recurve bows on the market. This will give you a good indication of what you can expect from a new bow.

As with many other products, when it comes to Recurve bows, you do get what you pay for. An exceptionally cheap recurve bow should be avoided because there's usually a reason why something is too cheap. A moderately priced bow that fits your budget and needs is likely your best bet, but if your budget is quite high, spend as much as you can afford. At the top of the price range, there are some really nice bows available.

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Dan Rasinweil has 1 articles online

Dan is in love with Recurve Bow Hunting and has a passion for BowTech Bows.

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When It's Time to Upgrade Your Recurve Bow

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This article was published on 2010/03/27